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The Lost Mind Trail

This is what we would call the trail but the real name is Lost Mine Trail which is in Big Bend National Park. It’s listed distance is 4.70 miles however my hiking app registered 5.30 miles round trip. The difference could be all the little side trails to see different views we ventured on that all added up to the extra half mile.

Lost Mine Trail map

We drove a short distance to the trailhead and as soon as we emerged from the car we were in awe of the incredible views surrounding us bringing energy and excitement to get on the trail and climb higher to see even more vistas. This was a trail that was most recommended to us and the trailhead views lived up to those recommendations but could the rest of the trail compete with these amazing sights.

The rocky Lost Mine Trail

 

Fortunately the trail is well traveled making it easier to follow but it’s littered with rocks to step over so as long as you are capable of walking at an incline for several miles while carefully navigated over and around the rocks. Staying on the trail in this climate is very important in preventing severed erosions during heavy rains which can wash out portions of the trail. These ‘shortcuts’ are tempting but not worth the potential damage for those hiking another day.

As the trail climbed up, the views became more impressive

As the trail continued higher and higher the views continued to be impressive making for distracted hiking and slowing down the pace to get to the top although a water break from time to time is a good idea allowing you to stop and view your surroundings. In addition to the desert mountain scenery we were confronted with cactus’s beginning to bloom adding to this great trail experience.Yet another distraction pulling attention away from getting to the top of the mountain.

Cactus's beginning to bloom

At different points along the way we were joined by other critters, mostly birds, looking as though asking how our hike was going and if we were enjoying the trail. Yes we were having fun for the most part. Unfortunately one of our group had inadequate footwear making the stones on the trail feel as though piercing into their feet with each step. If that’s the worst part than it’s a successful hike.

Mexican Jay joining us on the trail

Arriving at the top the trail levels out providing a sense of relief from continually climbing up, up, up towards the sky. Time to sit and taking in the vast mountainous landscape on this bright, sunny morning and join the others doing the same thing. While taking in the views I got the first opportunity of seeing a road runner closer up just before it decided to jump off the ledge and out of sight forever.

A road runner just before it plunged over the edge

The top of the Lost Mine Trail is actually quite large allowing many people to take in this high point without really creating problems moving back and forth among the boulders. There are many different view points to take in all amazing each to their own making this a nice way to spend an hour and possibly even enjoying a picnic surrounded by rocks and boulders rising from the ground. Watching a sunrise or sunset from this location would be breathtaking I’m sure as long as you’re not alone and with flashlights because the hike to get here or leave here would be in darkness. And ohh yah, there are these little things called mountain lions which tend to be more active during these times.

Taking in the views at the top of the Lost Mine Trail

During most of the time on top of this trail I kept looking at this rock which kind of looks like Homer Simpson and wondered how to climb up to the gap under his chin. I just couldn’t find a good path and without ropes it didn’t seem safe to both get there and climb up the rock. After spending some time exploring the area I decided it wasn’t a safe venture so kind of gave up on the idea. What kind of example would that be for the kids?

A little rock climbing along the way

By the way, challenge accepted.

For more stories of Big Bend you can read posts on the Rio Grande and Window Trail